“Today, we pause to remember the nearly 3,000 men and women who lost their lives in the horrific attacks of 9/11 and to honor the heroes of that terrible day.  The people we lost came from all walks of life, all parts of the country, and all corners of the world.  What they had in common was their innocence and that they were loved by those they left behind.

“Although it has been eight years since that day, we cannot let the passage of time dull our memories or diminish our resolve.  We still face grave threats from extremists, and we are deeply grateful to all those who serve our country to keep us safe.  I’m especially proud of the men and women at the Department of Energy who work hard every day to keep nuclear weapons out of the hands of terrorists.

“So as we honor those we’ve lost, let us also recommit ourselves to protecting and serving the country we love.  After all, our future will be determined not by what terrorists tore down but by what we together build up.

“The families of the victims are in all of our thoughts and prayers today.”

Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee today returned to the birthplace of his brainchild, 20 years after submitting his paper 'Information Management: A Proposal' to his manager Mike Sendall in March 1989. By writing the words 'Vague, but exciting' on the document's cover, and giving Berners-Lee the go-ahead to continue, Sendall signed into existence the information revolution of our time: the World Wide Web. In September the following year, Berners-Lee took delivery of a computer called a NeXT cube, and by December 1990 the Web was up and running, albeit between just a couple of computers at CERN*.

Today's event takes a look back at some of the early history, and pre-history, of the World Wide Web at CERN, includes a keynote speech from Tim Berners-Lee, and concludes with a series of talks from some of today's Web pioneers. The full event will be webcast at http://webcast.cern.ch, and relayed via http://tf1.lci.fr/infos/endirect/0,,4301948,00-les-20-ans-du-web-edition-speciale-.html. Highlights will be available to broadcasters via a Eurovision worldfeed scheduled for 19:00CET
(http://www.eurovision.net/net/content/worldfeeds.php).

"It's a pleasure to be back at CERN today," said Berners-Lee. "CERN has come a long way since 1989, and so has the Web, but its roots will always be here."

The World Wide Web is undoubtedly the most well known spin-off from CERN, but it's not the only one. Technologies developed at CERN have found applications in domains as varied as solar energy collection and medical imaging.

"When CERN scientists find a technological hurdle in the way of their ambitions, they have a tendency to solve it," said CERN Director General Rolf Heuer. "I'm pleased to say that the spirit of innovation that allowed Tim Berners-Lee to invent the Web at CERN, and allowed CERN to nurture it, is alive and well today."

SAN DIEGO, CA -- What effects will Earth's changing climate have on natural ecosystems? Which wild species are most at risk in coming decades for reduced range or even extinction? In a paper in this week's journal Nature, a team of researchers from the University of Kansas Natural History Museum and Biodiversity Research Center (UKNHM), the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), and the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California, San Diego, report on the first analysis of the potential impacts of climate change for an entire country, Mexico, including all species of mammals and birds as well as many species of butterflies -- some 1,870 species.