Fourteen partners have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to create a permanent research platform called STRATOS. The MoU was signed by 12 PRACE partners, the Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe, and two associated partners.

STRATOS stands for “PRACE advisory group for Strategic Technologies”. STRATOS has the goal to become a unique collaboration of PRACE partners and industry either directly or through consortia which include PRACE members. The objective of STRATOS is to foster the development of HPC (High Performance Computing) technologies in Europe.

The MoU was signed on 16 December, 2008 in Barcelona, Spain. 12 PRACE partners and one associated partner, the European industrial-academic association PROSPECT signed the MoU. The association Ter@tec acceded to the STRATOS MoU on 12 March, 2009.

Industrial and other innovative European HPC development projects engaged in development or evaluation of HPC technology can become members of STRATOS for the runtime of the projects.

The final cooperation agreement of the STRATOS partnership will be established as soon as the PRACE research infrastructure has become a European legal entity. During an initial period, STRATOS shall be governed by the MoU.

The following PRACE partners signed the MoU: Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ), Germany; Universität Stuttgart (HLRS), Germany; Leibniz-Rechenzentrum der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften (BADW-LRZ), Germany; Grand Equipement National de Calcul Intensif (GENCI), France; Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC), Spain; Netherlands National Computing Facilities Foundation (NCF), the Netherlands; Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), Sweden; CINECA Consorzio Interuniversitario (CINECA), Italy; CSC – IT Center for Science Ltd. (CSC), Finland; Eidgenössiche Technische Hochschule Zürich (ETHZ), Switzerland; Greek Research and Technology Network S.A (GRNET), Greece and Poznan Supercomputing and Networking Center (PSNC), Poland.

Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee today returned to the birthplace of his brainchild, 20 years after submitting his paper 'Information Management: A Proposal' to his manager Mike Sendall in March 1989. By writing the words 'Vague, but exciting' on the document's cover, and giving Berners-Lee the go-ahead to continue, Sendall signed into existence the information revolution of our time: the World Wide Web. In September the following year, Berners-Lee took delivery of a computer called a NeXT cube, and by December 1990 the Web was up and running, albeit between just a couple of computers at CERN*.

Today's event takes a look back at some of the early history, and pre-history, of the World Wide Web at CERN, includes a keynote speech from Tim Berners-Lee, and concludes with a series of talks from some of today's Web pioneers. The full event will be webcast at http://webcast.cern.ch, and relayed via http://tf1.lci.fr/infos/endirect/0,,4301948,00-les-20-ans-du-web-edition-speciale-.html. Highlights will be available to broadcasters via a Eurovision worldfeed scheduled for 19:00CET
(http://www.eurovision.net/net/content/worldfeeds.php).

"It's a pleasure to be back at CERN today," said Berners-Lee. "CERN has come a long way since 1989, and so has the Web, but its roots will always be here."

The World Wide Web is undoubtedly the most well known spin-off from CERN, but it's not the only one. Technologies developed at CERN have found applications in domains as varied as solar energy collection and medical imaging.

"When CERN scientists find a technological hurdle in the way of their ambitions, they have a tendency to solve it," said CERN Director General Rolf Heuer. "I'm pleased to say that the spirit of innovation that allowed Tim Berners-Lee to invent the Web at CERN, and allowed CERN to nurture it, is alive and well today."

A team of students from the University of Utah’s School of Computing won a competition to build and run a small supercomputer cluster —a high-performance network used to perform intensive calculations for complex data sets such as weather forecasts or nuclear fusion.

Four national teams, including the U. students and a team from Skyline High School in Salt Lake City, were given identical components and two days to assemble and deploy a supercomputing cluster for a specific task. The competition, called the "LittleFe Challenge," was part of SC12, the annual international supercomputing conference held this year in Salt Lake City.

Utah computer science students Leif Andersen, Bruce Bolick, Ian King, Tom Robertson, Kathryn Rodgers and Tyler Sorenson were members of the winning team.

The competition involved what is known as the traveling salesman problem.

Three sets of cities and coordinates were given to each team. The students were then asked to use their small supercomputer to find the shortest route for a traveling salesman to take that would include a visit to each city once and a return to the city of origin for each data set using their cluster. The teams were judged on best score, visualization of their results and their knowledge of high-performance computing.

Brian Haymore, Martin Cuma and Wim Cardoen from the U’s Center for High Performance Computing were mentors to the team. Their faculty advisor was Mary Hall, a computer science professor.

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